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 Post subject: Fleetwood Trawler
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 4:17 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:32 am
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Location: Preston
Another pic of Fleetwood's lost fleet:

Image

How do I make these pics bigger?

This tile was on the side of the former J Marrs building - site now ASDA

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 4:57 pm 
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Location: Fleetwood
Dave,

Quote:
How do I make these pics bigger?


Not sure, although if you click on the actual image it loads up the bigger version anyway. You might be copying the wrong code down at Imageshack. Try copying the 'hotlink for forums (1)' code (it's usually the first line of code beneath the adverts) rather than 'Thumbnail for forums' code.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 10:21 am 
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Gone - literally. The real FD24 was lost earlier this year. Details here, with a photo that must be deserving of a witty comment from Brian -

http://www.trawlerphotos.co.uk/gallery/ ... hoto=19683

The MAIB investigation report (link below the photograph, towards the bottom of the forum) makes interesting reading.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 10:47 am 
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Location: Fleetwood
No witty (or even mildly amusing) comment from me, David...mainly because I can't get the PDF to load in. I was hoping that Adobe Reader would load automatically...but all I got was a blank page instead. I suspect my computer needs reconfiguring, or the pilot light's blown out, or something.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:00 am 
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Location: Preston
Interesting reading indeed. Presumably action would be taken against those who operated the trawler as its loss appears to be due to blatant incompetence?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 12:29 pm 
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Does seem to be a degree of incompetence involved! Leaving a watertight door open probably isn't the most sensible thing to do on a trawler, but given this little lot, which the MAIB says are 'of concern', it's no wonder:

There was no common language understood by the vessel’s multi-national crew.

• No familiarisation training or emergency drills had been carried out since the crew joined the vessel.
• The skipper and mate, who were Portuguese, did not hold UK certificates of equivalent competency.
• There was no documentary evidence of the crew having attended any of the four mandatory basic safety courses.
• Risk assessments were written in Spanish and would not have been understood by all of the crew, including the skipper.

So, we can blame the Portugese and the Spanish for this one. As if it isn't bad enough that they get to keep all our fish.

Shame, as she was 18 months short of her 50th birthday.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 12:33 pm 
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On 23 January 2008 Royalist, a 36 metre UK registered fishing vessel, flooded and sank
during fishing operations when approximately 180nm off Dingle, Ireland. Royalist was about
to shoot her nets when she was hit by a large wave on her port side, which caused her to heel
to starboard. The vessel was starting to return to the upright when she was hit by a second
wave, after which she took on a permanent list due to the amount of water on her main deck
and within an accommodation alleyway. The list increased as water continued to wash over
the vessel’s submerged starboard gunwale in way of an open net hatch and was able to
progress into the engine room and aft accommodation. Although the crew attempted to stem
the flow of water by closing the net hatch, the vessel started to sink.
At 1553, the skipper sent distress messages on Inmarsat C and VHF radio channels 13 and
16, and ordered his crew to abandon the vessel into the vessel’s two liferafts. The skipper of
the French fishing vessel Damafran, which was fishing about 5 miles to the south, heard the
distress message and immediately cut his nets and headed for the stricken vessel. At 1645,
Royalist’s 18 crew were recovered by Damafran. Royalist sank by her stern 25 minutes later.
The MAIB investigation identified that the vessel’s stability was lost after water penetrated into
the accommodation from the main deck through a weathertight door, which had been left open.
It also identified a number of safety issues, which did not directly contribute to the accident, but
are of concern, including:
• There was no common language understood by the vessel’s multi-national crew.
• No familiarisation training or emergency drills had been carried out since the crew
joined the vessel.
• The skipper and mate, who were Portuguese, did not hold UK certificates of equivalent
competency.
• There was no documentary evidence of the crew having attended any of the four
mandatory basic safety courses.
• Risk assessments were written in Spanish and would not have been understood by all
of the crew, including the skipper.


just for you brian

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:13 pm 
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Location: Fleetwood
Cheers Mike.

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There was no common language understood by the vessel’s multi-national crew.


Ah...that's what happens when you send an English football team off on a fishing trip.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:39 pm
Posts: 147
Location: Fleetwood
I can remember ny Old Man sailing in the Royalist in the days when men went to sea to feed thier families. I'm almost certain that she was homewaters and not Icelandic but I could be wrong.

Enough of this as Fleetwood must be better these days as the smell of fish has been replaced by the stink of smack and greed.

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Martyn


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 9:12 pm 
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Location: Fleetwood
And raw sewerage, Martyn. Don't forget the smell of raw sewerage that smothers the town on a summer's evening like some carcenogenic duvet, but which, according to the local sewerage plant on Jameson Road, has nothing to do with them.

Incidentally, there are still one or two isolated houses that smell of rotten fish, mainly round the bottom end of Victoria Street...but they have nothing to do with trawlers.

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