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 Post subject: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 10:12 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:26 pm
Posts: 324
Location: Garstang
I`m particularly interested in the Wars of the Roses at the moment. As the House of Lancaster was intimately involved, one might expect some echoes of the conflict around here but I`m struggling to find any. Any suggestions?


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 Post subject: Re: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 10:54 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2008 5:44 pm
Posts: 32
Phil,
I have an interest in the Wars of the Roses also as a descendant of one of Henry Tudor's knights at Bosworth. You might be interested in a talk at the castle coming up in the near future - see Lancaster Castle events on the internet.

The attachment of the local area to the cause of Lancaster may not be as straightforward as you imagine and the Fylde may have been relatively free from battles in the period because of the influence of the Stanley family - one of the central players in the events. They initially supported Henry IV but then became part of the Yorkist establishment, generally acting to maintain their influence in Lancashire Cheshire and North Wales. Their centre of operations was at Lathom.

The Stanleys are generally hated by modern Ricardians because of their actions at Bosworth. Thomas Stanley was Henry VII's step father.

Local links to the wars are - pub names, Stanley becomes Earl of Derby after Bosworth.

Greenhalgh Castle is built in the period.

Hornby Castle is the centre of a dispute between Richard (of Gloucester later Richard III) and the Stanleys that some think influenced their later actions, but I am doubtful. Richard supported his friends the Harringtons against his brother's orders.

Peel Island was the landing point of Lambert Simnel's forces before the battle of Stoke in 1487.

David D


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 Post subject: Re: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 10:51 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:26 pm
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Location: Garstang
Thanks David. Is it likely that the Fylde would have been obliged to contribute men to the Yorkist cause then? Or was the Fylde outside the area in which men would have been coerced into fighting?


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 Post subject: Re: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:53 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:26 pm
Posts: 324
Location: Garstang
Not the War of the Roses but, from the ballad of Flodden Field:-


The lufty Stanley ftout did lead,
A ftock of ftriplings flrong of heart,

Brought up from babes with beef and bread ;
From Warton unto Warrington,

From Wigan unto Wirefdale,
From Wedicar to Waddington

From old Ribchefter to Ratchdale ;
From Poulton and Preflon, with pikes

They with the Stanley flout forth went ;
From Pemberton and Pilling dikes

For battle billmen bold were bent ;
With fellows frefli and fierce in fight

Which Horton fields turn'd out in fcores,
With lufty lads, liver and light,

From Blackburn and Bolton-i'th' moors ;


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 Post subject: Re: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2008 5:44 pm
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Phil,
Thanks for the poem, which I had not seen before. I think it is highly likely that people from the Fylde were recruited for the Yorkist cause, but that some would have been on the winning side at Bosworth. However, that is not to say that they would have been obviously Lancastrian - because, Henry Tudor's main support came from Yorkists, many of Edward IV's household having risen up against Richard III in autumn 1483 and returning from exile in Brittany and then France after the failure of the Buckingham rebellion.

Most of the Lancastrian nobility and gentry had been exterminated at the battles of Towton and Tewkesbury, so you could say that the York / Lancaster phase of the wars ended then. Until Towton, York was actually a centre of Lancastrian support.

Another symbol of the Stanley family is the Eagle and Child. Again, this names a few pubs around the country.

The Stanleys influence promoted a number of Lancashire men during the period - perhaps the most famous being Christopher Urswick.

It is said that the younger brother of Thomas Stanley (who became Earl of Derby), Sir William Stanley placed the crown on the head of Henry Tudor at Bosworth. His Wikipedia page has him born at Lytham.

David


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 Post subject: Re: Wars of the Roses in Fylde
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:02 pm
Posts: 14
I'm glad someone is calling them Stanleys and not Derbys. If you watch Shadow of the Tower series on You tube William IS the one that is supposed to have actively swapped his coat and i've read that bit about Lytham as well. In the English Civil Wars Lytham has links with the Stanley's James, the 7th earl. It's likely William had Holt castle just inside N Wales and the palatine of Chester, which they call ' little kingdom ' in Shadow of the Tower (abbr S.O.T.T)


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