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 Post subject: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 11:02 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 1:04 pm
Posts: 614
Location: just outside the fort
Passing through the village quite a lot recently, I am wondering where the name originates. I can't see it being anything to do with the sea creature on the name boards at the entry. I'm sure the experts on here can enlighten me.

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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 1:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:02 pm
Posts: 14
This seems to puzzle everyone. It may be from 'Delph' hence 'Delphin holm' an old Norse word by the sounds of that last part. 'Holmr' is old Norse for an island, not necessarily in a lake. There are islands in the land too. The delph is a hollow or depression sometimes due to there having been a quarry at one time but it seems a long shot, so suppose that brings us back full circle to 'God only knows' but it's worth looking it up in Ekwall's place names, there is also one on Lancashire place names in paper back, can't recall the author though. Sorry can't be of more help but not a great name change from 'Delphin' to Dolphin, but no allusion to the fish i'm sure.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 1:04 pm
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Location: just outside the fort
Robert,
Thanks for that, I had thought it would be related to 'delph' as there are a few in the north of England.

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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 10:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:02 pm
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there is a Delph lane in the neighbourhood at Oakenclough, the supposed Lancaster to Ribchester Roman road runs somewhere over there, but doubt the delph, if a quarry in this case, would date back that far, though who knows but i haven't come across any records of coins found there. There is an imfo sign on Delph lane opposite the former 'Stang Yule' plantation now sadly stripped of its lovelyness...ghastly sight if you remember it before the lumbermen moved in!. A beautiful place to be on a hot midsummer Sunday. If you manage to have a look at the British History Online page for Dolphinholme, the Victoria C Hist volumes are just amazing for most places and see what the online dictionary has for a 'delph' if anything. Am a big fan of the fleece inn there.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 2:34 pm
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Delph men was the old term for quarry men. Still in use in the 1760's.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:02 pm
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The only quarries i'm familiar with are the Longridge ones, maybe i need to do some more reading on other sources but there are unlikely to have been many in the Fylde. I may look the Delph men up myself so thanks for the definition there. There are innumerable old photos of the Longridge quarrymen but it would be interesting to go back to the Romans in this area and where the quarries were for Ribchester and Lancaster, latterly for Cockersand abbey in the 13th century, given that they are likely to have recycled from the ruined Roman fort at castle hill. Back to Dolhinholme, maybe we can find the site that gave the place its name originally.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:21 pm 
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Going back to the original question. It was Ekwald that produced a "Place-names of Lancashire". Check out

https://archive.org/stream/placenamesoflanc00ekwauoft/placenamesoflanc00ekwauoft_djvu.txt

His view is that the "Dolphin" portion of the name represents a personal name (Dolphin) and is probably Scandinavian.

Having said all that, I always find the subject of placenames very dubious.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 10:02 pm
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You have a point there, but in alot of cases it's hard to escape the phonetic similarities to say the least. I'm not sure about there being a Norseman with a name like that, we live in Grimsargh which has an obvious Norse origin, Dolphin sounds a bit naff by comparison but it could well have a Scandinavian personal prefix and makes sense with the 'holm' suffix, like i said an island, but Dolphin's island sounds like a 9th century fun park. Someone could exploit that as another Alton Towers. I'm favouring the delphin holm but keeping an open mind regards any allusion to a man named after a sea creature!!. NB: in Kenneth Brannagh's 'Henry V' Brian Blessed calls the French prince the 'Dolphin' but the original Shakespere line would be 'dauphin' which Larry Olivier's film uses. As you may know he had a dolphin on his coat of arms.


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 Post subject: Re: DOLPHINHOLME
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2016 9:49 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:32 am
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Location: Preston
The derivation appears to be from a Scandinavian personal name 'Dolgfinrr' - nowt to do with sea mammals. So it means 'island belonging to a man named Dolgfinrr'. Compare to Grimsargh (pasture of a man called Grimr - a Scandinavian personal name) and Goosnargh (pasture of a man called Gusan - an Old Irish personal name). The experts trace back the names to their earliest written record often Domesday Book and deduce earlier forms from their knowledge of how spoken words change over time. They also take into account local (historical) topography There might be an element of supposition (and even Ekwall is known to have been wrong ) but it's not the guesswork that some skeptics would have us believe.

It's more tricky when you try to figure out what the meaning of the personal name is/was. E. g. Robert probably knows that his name derives from Germanic elements 'hrod' - fame and 'beraht' - bright (Old English Hreodbeorht). The Normans brought over the newer version.

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