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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:51 pm 
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Glass,

First of all...make sure your images are all about 700 pixels in width or less...otherwise they'll be absolutely massive on the screen.

Secondly, type something into the 'Post a reply' box and then, instead of clicking on submit, click on preview. This allows you to edit your post (add different coloured fonts etc.)

On the 'preview' page, scroll down and you'll find an 'upload attachment' section. The rest, hopefully, is fairly self-explanatory.

At least, that's I how do it. If none of the above actually works, let me know and I'll figure something else out.

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http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 7:01 pm 
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Thanks Brian - I can hopefully submit the images tonight.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:07 pm 
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I WILL submit the Wardleys Creek images soon, but I will present here the story of my day - my first ever day - at Wardleys.

On a mission to view the ancient quayside, which I heard about on this forum and Brian Hughes' book 'Harold The Elk etc', I came to several conclusions.

Now some may recoil in horrror at what I have to say here, but this is my main finding.

Firstly, what an absolutely beautiful location, one enhanced by the utter friendliness of the locals.

The quayside and its maritime surrounds are an absolute joy.

But, I wonder, what are the possibilities of the marina at Wardleys ever being developed? Has Wyre Borough Council ever considered this?

What an asset to the area this would be - if I had the millions, I would try to push this through myself.

Instead of berths cut out of the mud, Wardleys could be a brand new marina with stone/concrete jetties and quaysides, with the original Georgian quayside as the centrepiece.

I am well aware how extreme this may seem and how much consideration would have to be given to the local population.

But what benefits could come to the area.

Anyway, back to the friendly locals and, whilst having a cooling pint at the back of the Wardleys pub, one chap showed me another quayside (which I suspect might be more of a sea wall) but very ancient nonetheless. This is sited at the back of the pub and has a brick wall built on top of it.

And then, in the distance, close by the rotting stumps of the old Wardleys ferry, the ferry sign itself complete with times and terms and conditions of passage.

Such history!

All in all, my missis and I had a brilliant day.

Pictures to follow...


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 9:44 pm 
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And, by popular demand, here are the first two of John's pictures...

Cheers for these John, and keep 'em coming (although I'm not sure how my dad would feel about his quiet afternoons on his boat being disturbed by a lot rich yacht owners):


Attachments:
0634 July 10NEW.jpg
0634 July 10NEW.jpg [ 106.79 KiB | Viewed 2149 times ]
0627 July 10NEW.jpg
0627 July 10NEW.jpg [ 146.07 KiB | Viewed 2146 times ]

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http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com
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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 10:24 am 
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More pictures will follow soon - I have another eight - but on the subject of the Georgian quayside, it does seeem to me that the slipway leading into the Wyre is actually part of the quayside. There is a complete iron ring at the very end (with a boat tied to it - image to follow) and all along its length to the bit with the numerals on it has distinctive markings where the other iron rings where.

There are also ancient steps (again, image to follow) at the back of the Wardleys pub that lead down to the ferry terminal.

By the way, sorry to be a pedant here, but should the word Wardleys have an apostrophe in it? I know it never has, so I suppose it is a word like Hastings, or even Cleveleys.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:00 pm 
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John,

Mr. Hampson will know doubt correct me if I'm wrong here, but I think the etymology for Wardleys is 'Ward' (Norse as in a 'guard post' or 'lookout cairn') and 'leys' (as in 'field/s on the sheltered side of a hill' -- hence the word 'leeward'). So, no possessive apostrophe...although it's probably up to individual preference.

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http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 4:35 pm 
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My OS map shows Wardley`s Pool and my Lancashire street map shows Wardley`s Hotel. It`s not exactly Eats Shoots and Leaves though so I suppose it`s a case of Please Yourself?


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 4:41 pm 
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What have I started here!!!!! Thanks for the responses - either way, what a beautiful and unique sounding Lancashire name Wardleys (or Wardley's) is.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 6:15 pm 
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Ah...in that case it's a question of personal or non-personal. I prefer the former version myself, although, I suspect, when the name was first applied apostrophes hadn't actually been invented.

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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 8:46 pm 
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OK Brian, I rise to the bait. 'Wardleys' could be from Old English (not necessarily Norse) 'weard' meaning watch and OE 'leah' meaning clearing (cf.Wardley in former Rutland or even closer - Warton near Kirkham is given as 'look out place') OR could be 'clearing' (leah) on the river bank / shore (OE warod-*th*) as in Warleigh Essex. If there was a weir it could be 'leah' by the 'wer' as also in Warleigh. There is a word 'ward' which is common word to English and other germanic languages including Norman (Norse) French and is the same as 'guard' - hence the castle 'guarderobe' and 'wardrobe' and 'ward of court'.

In terms of the apostrophe or not, isn't the full name Wardley's Creek? So it's the creek belonging to the leah of the weard. Or it could be that someone thought that Wardley was a person.

Particularly as nearby Warton has a similar possible etymology I'd go for 'look out clearing' and like to think it's to do with a defence system maybe originally devised by the Romans

OK red wine calls.

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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 9:05 pm 
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Dave,

Quote:
In terms of the apostrophe or not, isn't the full name Wardley's Creek?


Ah, well, now, therein lies the problem. Sometimes it's Wardley's Creek, sometimes it's Wardleys Creek, so it's difficult to say. Whatever the case, knowing that there's a Roman crossing between Wardleys and Stanah, I suspect the name is ancient and therefore more likely to refer to the location and use of said creek than to a specific person.

Possibly...

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http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 10:57 pm 
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Y'know - what a brilliant forum this is. Nuff said at this time of night.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2010 7:45 am 
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Another possibility is that it derives from 'weorf' and 'leah' meaning pasture for cattle. The key is not the apostrophe a but rhe 'rd' in the middle. If the 'rd' is original then 'weard' watch (place) is more likely. If a later insertion then the other meanings become more likely. The apostrophe could be a later error or the person 'Mr Wardley' could have got his name from where his family originated i.e. by the watch place, cattle pasture etc etc. So it comes down to the same thing - but not necessarily the same place.

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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2010 8:05 am 
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Dave,

There's a Wardley/Wardley's/Wardleys Hall somewhere in Lancashire, isn't there? I vaguely recall something about it having a screaming skull in it. (I read some guff, I really do.) I wonder if there's a connection...

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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2010 8:42 am 
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From this site:
http://www.aboutlancs.com/halls/halls.htm

Wardley Hall, Manchester - legend has it that the head of a certain Roger Downes was delivered, in a wooden box, to the Hall. He had escaped punishment for murder and then had his head cut off in a fight with a waterman on London Bridge. Downe's coffin was opened in 1779 and his head was where it should be. The skull at the Hall is that of a priest called Father Ambrose, son of a neighbour, Sir Alexander Barlow of Barlow Hall, who was hanged and quartered in 1641 for being a Roman Catholic (4).

No dig today?

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