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Welcome to The Fylde & Wyre Antiquarian (in association with Wyre Archaeology).


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:41 pm 
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Posts: 176
So does shrubbery but, like blubbery, doesn't fit somehow! Come on, get serious now!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 7:30 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2007 3:22 pm
Posts: 1845
Location: Fleetwood
John,

I'm going to be honest, I understand poetry in the same way that I understand calculus. Or to put it another way, I don't. Poetry to me is similar to football and country music in that I realise other people get it but it flies right over my head. I'm sure your poem is up there with the good stuff though.

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http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 7:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:50 pm
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How about this:

Enough of “the snaking tideline of half-eaten oranges and suspicious rubbery objects,”
Better, as a guideline and to avoid our cringes, to stick to fairly relevant subjects.

I was never any good at poetry.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Thu Aug 19, 2010 7:02 pm 
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Regarding my recent post about the upgrading of Wardleys Creek to a modern day marina, here is a picture of a modern marina at Porto Colom in Majorca.

Now I'm not for one minute attempting to compare the Fylde with the Balearics (the Fylde is much nicer) but this image shows a simple quay/jetty for mooring boats.

Would Wardleys look better like this?


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Thu Aug 19, 2010 7:07 pm 
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Now, here's one for the creek geeks (just like me). Wardleys pub from quite some time ago.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Aug 20, 2010 6:57 am 
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Location: Fleetwood
John,

That looks a bit like Fleetwood Marina...only with sunshine...and less cod-heads...and no plastic sharks...

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Brian Hughes: Curator of the Fylde and Wyre Antiquarian.
http://www.wyrearchaeology.blogspot.com


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:15 am 
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Nothing like digging up an old post (we are archaeologists after all) but I've just been reading an old article in a journal of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. It concerns the flax merchants of Kirkham. It seems that they used Wardley's to bring in flax from the Baltic. I have a couple of questions/points.

1. Looking at the number of flax mills in Kirkham there must have been many tons of raw material being transported to Kirkham every day. How did 18th Century roads cope?
2. Presumably a ferry was used to transport the cargo over the Wyre (adding to the difficulties) so why wasn't Skippool used?
3. Alternatively, why not use the Ribble? It was a lot closer.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:51 am 
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Posts: 176
In answer to question 2, I can only point to what must have been an excellent quayside and facilities at Wardleys.

Much of the quayside stonework remains (see previous pictures) although its lower parts are under the mud.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 6:46 pm 
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To try to answer question 3, I reached for the late Frank Singleton’s book “Kirkham, a short history”, published in 1980. I remember his talks and his knack of putting across his profound knowledge in an easily-understood way. In his book he deals at length with the Flax trade, but I think this one sentence sums it up best:- “In its natural state, the Wyre was a better river than the winding, silted Ribble and the Kirkham merchants made considerable use of it for their sea-going ships trading first from Skippool and later from Wardleys, where there was deeper water and a hard beach.”
Added to that, Poulton merchants were also involved in Skippool, at least initially, and I don’t think there is not that much difference in the distances between Kirkham/Skippool and Kirkham/Ribble at Preston.
I suppose the Ribble Navigation Act of 1805, the navigation companies and the opening of Preston Docks in 1892 changed things entirely.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2013 9:19 am 
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Looking back at the obverse of the Wardley's postcard.....WAF means With All Faults. It means that the seller has recognised its imperfections and has priced it accordingly.

I think Fyldecoaster has hit it on the head.


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 7:48 am 
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Morning. First post here. Found this place after reading a book on Anglo Saxons led to looking up the Brigantes on wikipedia. That led to me googling Bourne Hill and that led me here.

The reason I am posting in this thread is that I lived in Hambleton from when I was 3 until when I was 16. I am in exile now in London.

I have been reading through this thread and looking at the photos and I can smell the mud again and hear the boat masts tinkle. I used to wake up to that sound every morning.

My sister once got stuck in that mud (near the area in the photo). If anyone finds a shoe in the Marina near the road on the corner where a phonebox was it is probably hers. During the summer we used to walk up the lanes to Staynall - sometimes on the road, sometimes on the marsh where it was possible. Used to find a lot of dead sheep.

My extended family used to meet up at the Wardleys Pub every Sunday. I do remember someone telling me about the warehouses that used to be there.

I took this photo when I was 9. Wish I had more. Someday I'd like to come back and take a lot more photos - though I expect it's all changed quite a bit in the past 25 years.

Image
Wardley's Creek by wenxue2222, on Flickr


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 2:24 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:33 pm
Posts: 176
Excellent post about one of my favourite places.

Welcome to the Forum!


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 Post subject: Re: Wardley`s Creek
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:30 pm
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My first post, so I'm sorry to enter this conversation so late and as an amateur. Alan Keenlyside, in his excellent 2002 monograph on the River Wyre, gave some good reasons why Wardley's was sometimes preferred to Skippool - despite the more difficult land journey to Kirkham and elsewhere. Wardley's was preferred for larger ships because of its deep water and hard beach. There was little room to manoeuvre in the steep-sided Skippool Creek - and vessels had to back out of there at the end of their stay. Ships unable to moor up at Wardley's wharf could ground on the nearby pebble beach and discharge their cargoes to horse-drawn carts or packhorses at low tide. You can still see the cobbled ramp they used to reach the top of the wharf. I'm still puzzled about how the cargoes got to the far side of the river. I guess they could have been trans-shipped to smaller vessels and taken to Skippool, but why would there have been a need for warehouses at Wardley's?

I'm currently trying to get together some stuff on Wardley's for the Morecambe Bay Partnership, and would greatly appreciate any posts of pictures.


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